Campaign financing in Supreme Court

A Supreme Court decision expected as early as Wednesday could possibly change the landscape of election advertising. Click the headline to see Cameron Clark’s full report.

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Lawfare: Historical and Semiotic Origins of “Lawfare” (Panel 1)

September 10, 2010
War Crimes Research Symposium
Frederick K. Cox International Law Center
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Moderator:
Prof. Tawia Ansah, Visiting Professor, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Speakers:
Prof. Wouter Werner, VU University, Amsterdam
Prof. Susan Tiefenbrun, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Summary:
Traditionally “Lawfare” was defined as “a strategy of using—or misusing—law as a substitute for traditional military means to achieve an operational objective.” But lately, commentators and governments have applied the concept to International Criminal Tribunals, the defense counsel’s tactics challenging the detention of al Qaeda suspects in Guantanamo Bay, and as indicated in the quote above to the controversial Goldstone Commission Report. This symposium and Experts Meeting, featuring two-dozen leading academics, practitioners, and former government officials from all sides of the political spectrum, will examine the usefulness and appropriate application of the “Lawfare” concept.

Duration : 0:34:4

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Need some constitutional law help?

I keep reading from all the constitutional law scholars here on Y/A that we cannot do anything about the bonus money being paid to the AIG execs. (seems like the enron accounting they used is fraudulent). OK Clearly I think this is wrong, but i am not an expert. Why then is is OK to […]

Why Prohibition? – Cannabis in Canada

Jeff Stewart asks the question Why Prohibition? in a documentary on the legal status of Cannabis in Canada. To get a copy of the full version contact the filmmaker at Soal.Jack@gmail.com. This film was produced at NUTV at the University of Calgary in 2004. for more info on cannabis culture go to www.cannabisculture.com

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http://www.facebook.com/pages/Why-Prohibition/124059049088?ref=ts

You can buy a copy from http://www.whyprohibition.com

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Natural Rights, Enumerated Rights, and the Ninth Amendment

October 15, 2008
Speaker: Michael W. McConnell, Presidential Professor of Law, Judge, 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Summary: The Sumner Canary Lecture
When faced with drafting a Bill of Rights, members of the First Congress were faced with an impossible problem: what to include and what to leave out. Lockean theory told them that after construction of a social compact, such as the Constitution, the people would retain all rights not relinquished to the state. But what was the legal status of those retained rights, and how would they be affected by the explicit enumeration of some but not all of them?

Michael W. McConnell joined the faculty of S.J. Quinney College of Law in 1997 after teaching at the University of Chicago Law School for 12 years, where he was William B. Graham Professor of Law. Prior to his teaching career, Professor McConnell served as assistant to the solicitor general with the U.S. Department of Justice, assistant general counsel for the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and clerked for Chief Judge J. Skelly Wright, of the District of Columbia U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. He also served a clerkship with U.S. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan. Among the country’s most distinguished scholars in the fields of constitutional law and theory with a specialty in the religion clauses of the First Amendment, Professor McConnell has argued 11 times before the U.S. Supreme Court. He is widely published in the areas of church-state relations and the First Amendment. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was sworn in as a judge on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on January 3, 2003.

Professor McConnell teaches constitutional law, family law, state and local government, religion and the First Amendment.

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Brad Bannon on Supreme Court back in session

Scott interviews Washington DC political strategist Brad Bannon

(Huffington Post)

First Amendment cases top the Supreme Court’s docket as it begins a new term with a new justice and three women on the bench for the first time.

The court will look at provocative anti-gay protests at military funerals and a California law banning the sale of violent video games to children. These cases worry free speech advocates, who fear the court could limit First Amendment freedoms.

The funeral protest lawsuit, over signs praising American war deaths, “is one of those cases that tests our commitment to the First Amendment,” said Steven Shapiro, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Another case involves a different aspect of the First Amendment, the government’s relationship to religion. The justices will decide whether Arizona’s income tax credit scholarship program, in essence, directs state money to religious schools in violation of the constitutional separation of church and state.
More at http://lbnnews.com

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