How many presidents wrote executive orders?

And is there anyway to make the go away
And how come congress doesn’t have a say?

Every president from Washington to Obama has issued executive orders (including William Henry Harrison who was president for a mere 32 days). The Constitutional basis lies in Article II which empowers the President to see that "the laws are faithfully executed." To this end, the presidents are authorized to issue orders to government personnel to adhere to various laws and policies.

Though every president has issued executive orders, the vast majority of the earlier ones were simple written instructions sent by presidents to various agency and department heads — thus they were never catalogued. The actual numbering of the Executive orders only began in 1907 when the State Department began the process of putting a number classification to executive orders. The Secretary of State backnumbered the orders to 1862, and the issuance of the most famous executive order of all time — President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation (which retroactively became "Executive Order 1.")

Congress can get involved with executive orders if they believe a president has gone too far. For example, in the 1990s, President Clinton issued an executive order allowing gays and lesbians to serve in the federal government (minus the military) openly. Some Republicans introduced legislation to overrule this order, but they couldn’t muster enough support — so the order stands.

Presidents are authorized to faithfully execute laws, and that gives them the constitutional basis of orders and direction to all governmental agencies.

Hope this helps.

Post Author: mark

5 thoughts on “How many presidents wrote executive orders?

    VSF

    (February 5, 2010 - 1:31 am)

    13
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    Daniel K

    (February 5, 2010 - 2:03 am)

    ye like 13
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    Patrick G

    (February 5, 2010 - 2:44 am)

    There have been over 13,000 numbered executive orders issued by presidents starting with Abraham Lincoln who issued the Emancipation Proclamation as executive order.

    If you go way back to before they were called executive orders and apply the definition to presidential proclamations…. then Andrew Jackson made the first executive order and 25 presidents have done so as well.

    If you only count executive orders that were made as executive orders then only 14 presidents have issued them.
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    I ♥ txmuzk

    (February 5, 2010 - 3:13 am)

    If you want to destroy the Presidential orders, the sanctity of the job will be dismantled, the Presidential orders are part of a wide array of rights for your past Presidents, current and future Presidents to keep this Beloved Country moving for many years. Don’t let your prejudice nature take over for reason because it will destroy this country. We are in debt on the world market, don’t forget what we have done with the Dollar. Why not concern yourself with moving forward in a constructive manner?
    References :

    Will

    (February 5, 2010 - 3:42 am)

    Every president from Washington to Obama has issued executive orders (including William Henry Harrison who was president for a mere 32 days). The Constitutional basis lies in Article II which empowers the President to see that "the laws are faithfully executed." To this end, the presidents are authorized to issue orders to government personnel to adhere to various laws and policies.

    Though every president has issued executive orders, the vast majority of the earlier ones were simple written instructions sent by presidents to various agency and department heads — thus they were never catalogued. The actual numbering of the Executive orders only began in 1907 when the State Department began the process of putting a number classification to executive orders. The Secretary of State backnumbered the orders to 1862, and the issuance of the most famous executive order of all time — President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation (which retroactively became "Executive Order 1.")

    Congress can get involved with executive orders if they believe a president has gone too far. For example, in the 1990s, President Clinton issued an executive order allowing gays and lesbians to serve in the federal government (minus the military) openly. Some Republicans introduced legislation to overrule this order, but they couldn’t muster enough support — so the order stands.

    Presidents are authorized to faithfully execute laws, and that gives them the constitutional basis of orders and direction to all governmental agencies.

    Hope this helps.
    References :

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