From House of Lords to Supreme Court

From 31 July 2009, the judicial function of the House of Lords and its role as the final – and highest – appeal court in the UK will end, bringing about a fundamental change to the work and role of the House of Lords.

A new United Kingdom Supreme Court, separating the judicial function from Parliament (those who make the law from those who interpret it in courts), will open in early October 2009 opposite the Houses of Parliament in Parliament Square – formerly the Middlesex Guildhall.

Lord Mance, one of the 12 Law Lords in the House of Lords, outlines the key changes to the judicial role of Parliament.

Find out more:
House of Lords homepage: http://www.parliament.uk/lords
Judicial Work: http://www.parliament.uk/business/judicial_work.cfm

Duration : 0:4:41


Post Author: mark

7 thoughts on “From House of Lords to Supreme Court

    romanali1

    (February 6, 2010 - 1:00 pm)

    The use of the …
    The use of the omega symbol in the logo of the supreme court is most intriguing. It seems that the supreme court is suggesting it has the final say on justice.

    Of course it does, as far as the realm of the UK is concerned, but omega usually references God in the Christian tradition, and so I wonder if it is blasphemous in Christianity to use the omega symbol in the logo?

    I’m probably reading too much into it; but the logo didn’t design itself. It would be nice to see the rationale for it.

    inkstersco

    (February 6, 2010 - 1:00 pm)

    This will be a new …
    This will be a new tradition.

    fungbenjaminuk

    (February 6, 2010 - 1:00 pm)

    Actually, I think …
    Actually, I think that more efforts should be spent explaining the differences in the powers and responsibilities of the current two Houses in Parliament – and eliminate the duplication of resources in the political system to restore its trust through transparency.

    fungbenjaminuk

    (February 6, 2010 - 1:00 pm)

    Pity. The …
    Pity. The demolition of a significant British tradition may symbolize something too radical in the UK. Did the original juridical power of the House of Lords invited public complaint? How in reality would this separation of powers lead to the juridical process free of politics? Does this diminish trust, honor, credibility of and respect towards the House of Lords.

    jadamwahh

    (February 6, 2010 - 1:00 pm)

    Baresolid is right …
    Baresolid is right the House of Lords is fantastic and its role massively underrated – i dont think this move threatens that though I like the idea of a proper speration of powers.

    brianlj

    (February 6, 2010 - 1:00 pm)

    Excellent stuff. …
    Excellent stuff. Goes a long way towards dispelling the myth of the Lords being a stuffy out of touch institution.

    jadamwahh

    (February 6, 2010 - 1:00 pm)

    This is great its …
    This is great its not often you get to hear directly from a judge on stuff like this

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