Lawrence Lessig: Congress to Blame for Bush Era Mistakes

Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/10/08/Lawrence_Lessig_on_Institutional_Corruption

Stanford Law professor Lawrence Lessig explores the concept of institutional responsibility by comparing a boarding school sexual abuse case with Congress during the Administration of President George W. Bush. In both cases, he argues that witnesses who did not act responsibly should be held just as culpable as the offender.

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Larry Lessig introduces the Safra lecture series with a discussion on institutional corruption.

He explores the prevalence of this form of corruption in fields ranging from politics to medicine to journalism, and describes his plan to study and contain this problem. – Safra Foundation Center for Ethics at Harvard University

Lawrence Lessig is a professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of the school’s Center for Internet and Society. He teaches and writes in the areas of constitutional law, contracts, and the law of cyberspace. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he was Berkman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and a professor at the University of Chicago.

He clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and for Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court. For much of his career, he has focused on law and technology, especially as it affects copyright.

Recognized for arguing against interpretations of copyright that could stifle innovation and discourse online, he is CEO of the Creative Commons project, and he has been a columnist for Wired, Red Herring, and The Industry Standard.

Duration : 0:3:11

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Lawfare: Historical and Semiotic Origins of “Lawfare” (Panel 1)

September 10, 2010
War Crimes Research Symposium
Frederick K. Cox International Law Center
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Moderator:
Prof. Tawia Ansah, Visiting Professor, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Speakers:
Prof. Wouter Werner, VU University, Amsterdam
Prof. Susan Tiefenbrun, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Summary:
Traditionally “Lawfare” was defined as “a strategy of using—or misusing—law as a substitute for traditional military means to achieve an operational objective.” But lately, commentators and governments have applied the concept to International Criminal Tribunals, the defense counsel’s tactics challenging the detention of al Qaeda suspects in Guantanamo Bay, and as indicated in the quote above to the controversial Goldstone Commission Report. This symposium and Experts Meeting, featuring two-dozen leading academics, practitioners, and former government officials from all sides of the political spectrum, will examine the usefulness and appropriate application of the “Lawfare” concept.

Duration : 0:34:4

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Condi Rice Pulls a Nixon: If the President Orders Torture, It Must be Legal

Watch more at http://www.theyoungturks.com

Duration : 0:4:22

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Constitutional Law Prof. Turley on War Crimes

“It is equally immoral to stand silent in the face of a war crime and do nothing.”

Duration : 0:5:59

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