Are you Free Man? This is not legal advice…1/4

To answer the question of ‘what acts and statutes’ are not regarded as law, the answer is none of them. To what Laws do you have to give authority to? Your own. Figure out what they are, then live by them (and serve notice, if you care to change anything for the others that are still slaves to the system…and the future)

Duration : 0:10:32

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Abolish Religious Exemptions from the Law? (Part 2)

In the United States and other countries, religious institutions have traditionally enjoyed a privileged position, i.e., they have been granted exemptions from compliance with certain laws (including, without limitation, laws against discrimination in employment and laws requiring the payment of taxes). Is it appropriate or even useful for religion to have this privileged status?

Links:

1. Wisconsin Supreme Court’s use of the “ministerial exception” to dismiss an age discrimination case against a Catholic school system

http://www.wicourts.gov/sc/opinion/DisplayDocument.pdf?content=pdf&seqNo=38088

2. New York Court of Appeals decision in Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Albany v. Serio

http://www.law.cornell.edu/nyctap/I06_0127.htm

3. California Supreme Court’s decision in Catholic Charities of Sacramento v. Superior Court (Unfortunately, I can’t find a generally accessible URL for this decision. The citation is 85 P.3d 67 (2004).)

4. Jonathan Turley’s Op-Ed piece entitled “When it comes to religious groups, who’s really facing discrimination?”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/16/AR2010041602027.html

5. Employment Division v. Smith

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0494_0872_ZO.html

6. Bob Jones University v. United States

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0461_0574_ZO.html

7. New York Times article on the Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association case

8. Part 1 of this video series

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5TBxCfnFiw

Duration : 0:9:56

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About The S E Farris Law Firm Personal Injury Attorney St Louis Missouri Free Case Evaluation Call 314 252 9937

farrislawfirmhttp://gdata.youtube.com/feeds/api/users/farrislawfirmPeopleAbout, The, S, E, Farris, Law, Firm, Personal, Injury, Attorney, St, Louis, Missouri, Free, Case, Evaluation, Call, 314, 252, 9937About The S E Farris Law Firm Personal Injury Attorney St Louis Missouri Free Case Evaluation Call 314 252 9937

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Constitutional Law Prof. Frank Askin: Part 1

Prof. Frank Askin of the Rutgers Law School, NJ Constitutional Litigation Clinic on free speech in condos and co-ops. Featuring Twin Rivers and Galaxy complexes in NJ.

Duration : 0:28:26

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Taking Free Exercise Rights Seriously

March 30, 2006
Speaker: Professor Alan E. Brownstein, University of California, Davis School of Law
Presented by: Center for Professional Ethics

Summary: William A. Brahms Lecture on Law and Religion

• Constitutional law does not take free exercise rights seriously. Creating a more complex free exercise jurisprudence

• How do we balance religious exercise against conflicting state interests?

Professor Brownstein is an expert on church-state issues and has also written extensively on freedom of speech, privacy and autonomy rights and other constitutional law subjects. His articles have been published in numerous academic journals, including the Stanford Law Review. Professor Brownstein teaches Constitutional Law, Law and Religion, and Torts at the UC Davis School of Law, is a frequent lecturer at academic conferences and in law related programs before civic, legal, religious and educational groups. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1977.

Duration : 1:2:14

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Violent Video Game Law Divides Supreme Court

California passed a law five years ago to block the sale of violent video games to minors, but the industry fought back. Jan Crawford reports, the case has the Supreme Court divided.

Duration : 0:1:17

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Josh Freese: Indie 1031 Interview w/ Joe Escalante -How To Sell Too Many Records -Part 2

PART 2 of 2. Josh came by my legal advice show to talk about the constant threat of selling “too many records” that dogs his new release “Since 1972” on Outerscope Records. Usually on this show I’m taking calls and answering show biz legal questions but we took a break from that to get an update on what’s happening with Josh’s cool and effective price tiering that has made his new CD something everyone is talking about where ever I go.

Barely Legal Radio can be heard live every Friday from 11am to noon on indie1031.com in Los Angeles hosted by Joe Escalante. Call on Fridays to get your legal questions answered for free or better yet, email your questions to info@barelylegalradio.com and we will set up a time to call you back and record your question and answer for the next broadcast. Go to barelylegalradio.com for more details. It’s free and worth every penny.

Duration : 0:9:17

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Abolish Religious Exemptions from the Law? (Part 1)

In the United States and other countries, religious institutions have traditionally enjoyed a privileged position, i.e., they have been granted exemptions from compliance with certain laws (including, without limitation, laws against discrimination in employment and laws requiring the payment of taxes). Is it appropriate or even useful for religion to have this privileged status?

Links:

1. Regarding Christian Legal Society v. Martinez–

–the decision of the federal district court in favor of the law school

http://www.alliancealert.org/2006/20060417.pdf

–the decision of the 9th Circuit affirming the trial court’s ruling

http://www.scotusblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/08-1371_ca9.pdf

–SCOTUS WIKI’s entry on the case (lots of information and material)

http://www.scotuswiki.com/index.php?title=Christian_Legal_Society_v._Martinez

2. Archbishop Donald Wuerl’s talk entitled “Religious Freedom and Marriage”

3. Washington D.C.’s marriage equality and nondiscrimination law and related material

http://www.dccouncil.washington.dc.us/lims/legislation.aspx?LegNo=B18-0482&Description=RELIGIOUS-FREEDOM-AND-CIVIL-MARRIAGE-EQUALITY-AMENDMENT-ACT-OF-2009.&ID=23204

http://www.dccouncil.washington.dc.us/images/00001/20100409103713.pdf

4. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/titlevii.cfm

5. McClure v. The Salvation Army (the first federal appeals court decision to recognize a “ministerial exception” to Title VII)

http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=7674766003352112619&hl=en&as_sdt=2&as_vis=1&oi=scholarr

6. Part 2 of this video series

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GHVxMDRx6o

Duration : 0:10:29

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Fox News: libraries can’t show anti-religious art

In this interview from Fox News some guy comes on and suggests that libraries don’t have the legal right to have anti-religious art in their exhibits.

Feel free to comment and criticize.

Correct me if I am wrong but I do not think that the man manages to string together a coherent legal argument. It came across as white noise to me. Am I missing something?

I think it would be absurd if anything religious or non-religious was prohibited from libraries. I do not have a problem with religious art being sold at libraries, government institution or not. Pictures of crosses, or art with other religious imagery, is in my opinion perfectly acceptable if it is being sold _as art_ in a library, and not being used to promote religion. The same is true of anti-religious art.

It becomes a problem only when the state is putting religion (or irreligion) where it doesn’t belong, like in schools, on the money, or in the pledge of allegiance. In that case, it is simply a promotion of religion by the government.

Here, we are not talking about the promotion or religion or irreligion. We are talking about art being sold at a library. It would be very strange indeed if libraries were prohibited from holding items that have any implications for religion (positive or negative). The reason libraries are allowed to carry religious books, like the bible, is because they are not being used to promote religion. They are being held as part of the libraries collection -this is an acceptable purpose for a library, government run or not. The same goes for sales of art. If it is not the promotion of religion (or irreligion) but is the sale or display of art, it is constitutionally acceptable.

Duration : 0:3:49

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