Lawfare: Historical and Semiotic Origins of “Lawfare” (Panel 1)

September 10, 2010
War Crimes Research Symposium
Frederick K. Cox International Law Center
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Moderator:
Prof. Tawia Ansah, Visiting Professor, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Speakers:
Prof. Wouter Werner, VU University, Amsterdam
Prof. Susan Tiefenbrun, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Summary:
Traditionally “Lawfare” was defined as “a strategy of using—or misusing—law as a substitute for traditional military means to achieve an operational objective.” But lately, commentators and governments have applied the concept to International Criminal Tribunals, the defense counsel’s tactics challenging the detention of al Qaeda suspects in Guantanamo Bay, and as indicated in the quote above to the controversial Goldstone Commission Report. This symposium and Experts Meeting, featuring two-dozen leading academics, practitioners, and former government officials from all sides of the political spectrum, will examine the usefulness and appropriate application of the “Lawfare” concept.

Duration : 0:34:4

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Natural Rights, Enumerated Rights, and the Ninth Amendment

October 15, 2008
Speaker: Michael W. McConnell, Presidential Professor of Law, Judge, 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Summary: The Sumner Canary Lecture
When faced with drafting a Bill of Rights, members of the First Congress were faced with an impossible problem: what to include and what to leave out. Lockean theory told them that after construction of a social compact, such as the Constitution, the people would retain all rights not relinquished to the state. But what was the legal status of those retained rights, and how would they be affected by the explicit enumeration of some but not all of them?

Michael W. McConnell joined the faculty of S.J. Quinney College of Law in 1997 after teaching at the University of Chicago Law School for 12 years, where he was William B. Graham Professor of Law. Prior to his teaching career, Professor McConnell served as assistant to the solicitor general with the U.S. Department of Justice, assistant general counsel for the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and clerked for Chief Judge J. Skelly Wright, of the District of Columbia U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. He also served a clerkship with U.S. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan. Among the country’s most distinguished scholars in the fields of constitutional law and theory with a specialty in the religion clauses of the First Amendment, Professor McConnell has argued 11 times before the U.S. Supreme Court. He is widely published in the areas of church-state relations and the First Amendment. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was sworn in as a judge on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on January 3, 2003.

Professor McConnell teaches constitutional law, family law, state and local government, religion and the First Amendment.

Duration : 1:8:21

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Dean Lindsey Cowen Business Law Lecture – Hon. Frank H. Easterbrook

Dean Lindsey Cowen Business Law Lecture
Hon. Frank H. Easterbrook – Chief Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
April 8, 2008 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Is Corporate Law Still a Race to the Top?
Judge Easterbrook will revisit issues relating to corporate law, in particular whether competition between states for corporate charters produces a race to the top of corporate law, a long-standing assumption in academic literature.

Duration : 1:1:20

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Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court – Antitrust

September 16, 2010
“Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court”
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Center for Business Law and Regulation Symposium
Cleveland, Ohio

Duration : 1:28:50

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2008 William A. Brahms Lecture on Law and Religion – Edward J. Larson

2008 William A. Brahms Lecture on Law and Religion
Edward J. Larson – University Professor of History and Hugh & Hazel Darling Professor of Law, Pepperdine University
Oct 16, 2008 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
From Dayton to Dover: A History of the Evolution Teaching Legal Controversy in America
Larson will explore the history of judicial interpretations of the Establishment Clause as applied to various specific efforts to limit the teaching of evolution in public school over the past century. The legal controversy will be set in its cultural and religious context to give a deeper appreciation of constitutional law and its practical application in everyday disputes over classroom instruction and public-school education.

Duration : 1:20:34

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Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court – Pleading Standards

September 17, 2010
“Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court”
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Center for Business Law and Regulation Symposium
Cleveland, Ohio

Duration : 1:27:37

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Taking Free Exercise Rights Seriously

March 30, 2006
Speaker: Professor Alan E. Brownstein, University of California, Davis School of Law
Presented by: Center for Professional Ethics

Summary: William A. Brahms Lecture on Law and Religion

• Constitutional law does not take free exercise rights seriously. Creating a more complex free exercise jurisprudence

• How do we balance religious exercise against conflicting state interests?

Professor Brownstein is an expert on church-state issues and has also written extensively on freedom of speech, privacy and autonomy rights and other constitutional law subjects. His articles have been published in numerous academic journals, including the Stanford Law Review. Professor Brownstein teaches Constitutional Law, Law and Religion, and Torts at the UC Davis School of Law, is a frequent lecturer at academic conferences and in law related programs before civic, legal, religious and educational groups. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1977.

Duration : 1:2:14

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Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court – Labor and Employment

September 17, 2010
“Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court”
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Center for Business Law and Regulation Symposium
Cleveland, Ohio

Duration : 1:30:23

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evidence of economic collapse martial law preparations

martial law preparation from engineered economic collapse evidence had this video 1/2 finished as of late there were some recent interviews that spurred me to finish this. Anyway, something to think about and keep your eyes open for . Nobody really knows what the plan is until it gets underway , but we can connect the dots and mentally prepare. I hope and pray nothing like what you see in the end occurs but the signs are there.

Duration : 0:10:59

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JFK, Executive Order 11110 and the Warren Commission

 

www.whatreallyhappened.com ******* On June 4, 1963, a little known attempt was made to strip the Federal Reserve Bank of its power to loan money to the government at interest. On that day President John F. Kennedy signed Executive Order No. 11110 that returned to the US government the power to issue currency, without going through the Federal Reserve. Mr. Kennedy’s order gave the Treasury the power “to issue silver certificates against any silver bullion, silver, or standard silver dollars …

Duration : 0:2:39

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