The Librarians Who Battled the Patriot Act – David Goodman

Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/04/14/Amy_and_David_Goodman_Standing_Up_to_the_Madness

Mother Jones journalist David Goodman tells the story of four Connecticut librarians who were ordered by the FBI to release library records under the Patriot Act. After filing suit against the Attorney General to challenge the order, the librarians eventually won the case.

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The longtime host of the award-winning Pacifica Radio’s Democracy Now!, Amy Goodman has steadfastly covered grassroots activism, the political process, and government accountability. She has co-authored many books with her brother and fellow journalist, David Goodman.

Their collaborations include investigations into the mercenary aspects of war, media culpability, freedom of information, and international human rights, and seek not only to expose endemic corruption, but also to affect change.

Their bestselling book, The Exception to the Rulers: Exposing Oily Politicians, War Profiteers, and the Media That Love Them, examines the full political spectrum, from The Washington Post to Bill Clinton, in an effort to bring genuine accountability into public discourse. The Goodmans’ latest project is Standing Up to the Madness: Ordinary Heroes in Extraordinary Times. Standing Up to the Madness celebrates grassroots activists across America and the power of the individual to bring change on a local and national level. – City Arts and Lectures

David Goodman is a contributing writer for Mother Jones. and co-author of Static: Government Liars, Media Cheerleaders and the People Who Fight Back.

Duration : 0:9:31

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Bush & Presidential Powers (2 of 2)

Louis Fisher participated in the second panel of the Hauenstein Center’s Bush legacy conference in Washington, D.C. The panel explored “Presidential Powers and the Bush Administration.”

Louis Fisher is a senior specialist in separation of powers with the Law Library of the Library of Congress. He began work with the Library of Congress in 1970 and served as research director of the House Iran-Contra Committee in 1987, writing major sections of the final report.

His books include President and Congress (1972), Presidential Spending Power (1975), The Constitution Between Friends (1978), The Politics of Shared Power (4th ed. 1998), Constitutional Conflicts Between Congress and the President (4th ed. 1997), Constitutional Dialogues (1988), American Constitutional Law (6th ed. 2005), Presidential War Power (2d ed. 2004), Political Dynamics of Constitutional Law (with Neal Devins, 3d ed. 2001), Congressional Abdication on War and Spending (2000), Religious Liberty in America: Political Safeguards (2002), Nazi Saboteurs on Trial: A Military Tribunal & American Law (2003; 2d ed. 2005), The Politics of Executive Privilege (2004), The Democratic Constitution (with Neal Devins, 2004) and Military Tribunals and Presidential Power: American Revolution to the War on Terrorism (2005). His textbook in constitutional law is available in two paperbacks: Constitutional Structures: Separation of Powers and Federalism and Constitutional Rights: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. With Leonard W. Levy he edited the four-volume Encyclopedia of the American Presidency (1994). He has twice won the Louis Brownlow Book Award, the encyclopedia he co-edited was awarded the Dartmouth Medal, and in 1995 he received the Aaron B. Wildavsky Award For Lifetime Scholarly Achievement in Public Budgeting from the Association for Budgeting and Financial Management.

Duration : 0:7:4

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KO Countdown : Wiretap 090407 : What Americans Can Do

MSNBC
Countdown

Wiretap
20090407
Whats a freedom-loving American do to?

Constitutional law Prof. Jonathan Turley discusses the legal ramifications of the Obama administrations defense of former President George Bushs wiretapping policy.

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Source
http://msnbc.com

Duration : 0:4:12

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The Case for Cameras in the Supreme Court

Cameras are everywhere today: In convenience stores, at intersections, the workplace, your computer, your cellphone, ATM machines. There’s even been a camera in news anchor Katie Couric.

Yet there’s one place cameras have never been allowed: The U.S. Supreme Court. Just what are Supreme Court justices hiding beneath their robes that they continue to say no to cameras in their courtroom?

For decades the White House and Congress have opened their public business to television cameras, but the judicial branch has remained staunchly against the practice. As C-SPAN’s Brian Lamb tells Reason.tv, the justices have rebuffed every attempt to videotape the oral arguments phase of Supreme Court proceedings. On this, an often-divided court remains unanimous, even if the arguments offered up Justices Scalia, Breyer, Thomas, Kennedy, and others remain even weaker than the majority’s logic in their awful Kelo decision, which legitimated eminent domain abuse.

Both Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan have spoken in favor of cameras in the Supreme Court. Can a new batch of justices, more attune to the benefits of transparency, finally change things for the better?

“The Case for Cameras in The Supreme Court” is written and produced by Meredith Bragg and Nick Gillespie, who also hosts.

Approximately 3.40 minutes.

Go to http://reason.tv for iPod, HD, and audio versions of this and all our videos, and subscribe to Reason.tv’s YouTube channel to receive automatic notifications when new material goes live.

Duration : 0:3:39

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