Bush & Presidential Powers (2 of 2)

Louis Fisher participated in the second panel of the Hauenstein Center’s Bush legacy conference in Washington, D.C. The panel explored “Presidential Powers and the Bush Administration.”

Louis Fisher is a senior specialist in separation of powers with the Law Library of the Library of Congress. He began work with the Library of Congress in 1970 and served as research director of the House Iran-Contra Committee in 1987, writing major sections of the final report.

His books include President and Congress (1972), Presidential Spending Power (1975), The Constitution Between Friends (1978), The Politics of Shared Power (4th ed. 1998), Constitutional Conflicts Between Congress and the President (4th ed. 1997), Constitutional Dialogues (1988), American Constitutional Law (6th ed. 2005), Presidential War Power (2d ed. 2004), Political Dynamics of Constitutional Law (with Neal Devins, 3d ed. 2001), Congressional Abdication on War and Spending (2000), Religious Liberty in America: Political Safeguards (2002), Nazi Saboteurs on Trial: A Military Tribunal & American Law (2003; 2d ed. 2005), The Politics of Executive Privilege (2004), The Democratic Constitution (with Neal Devins, 2004) and Military Tribunals and Presidential Power: American Revolution to the War on Terrorism (2005). His textbook in constitutional law is available in two paperbacks: Constitutional Structures: Separation of Powers and Federalism and Constitutional Rights: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. With Leonard W. Levy he edited the four-volume Encyclopedia of the American Presidency (1994). He has twice won the Louis Brownlow Book Award, the encyclopedia he co-edited was awarded the Dartmouth Medal, and in 1995 he received the Aaron B. Wildavsky Award For Lifetime Scholarly Achievement in Public Budgeting from the Association for Budgeting and Financial Management.

Duration : 0:7:4

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Lawfare: Historical and Semiotic Origins of “Lawfare” (Panel 1)

September 10, 2010
War Crimes Research Symposium
Frederick K. Cox International Law Center
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Moderator:
Prof. Tawia Ansah, Visiting Professor, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Speakers:
Prof. Wouter Werner, VU University, Amsterdam
Prof. Susan Tiefenbrun, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Summary:
Traditionally “Lawfare” was defined as “a strategy of using—or misusing—law as a substitute for traditional military means to achieve an operational objective.” But lately, commentators and governments have applied the concept to International Criminal Tribunals, the defense counsel’s tactics challenging the detention of al Qaeda suspects in Guantanamo Bay, and as indicated in the quote above to the controversial Goldstone Commission Report. This symposium and Experts Meeting, featuring two-dozen leading academics, practitioners, and former government officials from all sides of the political spectrum, will examine the usefulness and appropriate application of the “Lawfare” concept.

Duration : 0:34:4

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